Rootin Tootin Treasury on Etsy

The deep south… where manicures are pointless, words don’t end in “ing”, and people spend more on their belt buckles than they do on any other accessory. Where you wear boots in the winter and flip flops in the summer. We literally have our own language, syntax and adverbs. When you come visit, you’re family!

Take a look at the best embellishments of the deep southerner in your life on my Etsy Treasury and scroll through my own personal notes on these wonder designers and makers!

Beginner level pattern for a Horse Earflap Hat from Family Tradition Crafts. Wonderful pattern writer. I LOVE the bridle on this one! So cute!

It’s no secret that we love our crosses here in the south. I save all my horse shoes and have them displayed on the wall of my barn. My son has horseshoe nails bent around the bills of all his favorite camo caps. This takes it a step further. I would totally wear this Horseshoe Nail Cross Pendant from Silverdragon Crafts.

In the south, we display our style freely. Everything we own; our houses, our fences, our trucks, and our blogs have to have our own unique style displayed all over it. Even our babies are stuck in cowboy hats within the first few months, crammed into cowboy boots, and made to sleep in hay just to show how serious we are. This Cowboy Hat from Two Brothers Blankets will help you do just that! I kind of wish I crocheted when my son was little so I could have done this for him! Had I known I could just buy the item, I probably would have!

Thomasina Cummings Designs’ Crochet Guitar Blanket Pattern. Curl up under a musical delight while listening to your favorite songs picked on a cold night near a campfire.

A perfect little Horse Lovey Pattern from Bowtykes! So sweet!

Everyone knows a girl’s best friend is her pony! It’s not an obsession, it’s a lifestyle. Jazz up the apple of your eye with this cute little Horse Ribbon Sculpture Hair Clip from Ella Bella Bows.

Whole Knit and Caboodle’s Charlie the Horse Amigurumi Pattern – because you can never have enough ponies!

What a cute little Jersey Cow Hat by Crochet By Carla. Puts a new meaning to “little milk monster”!

L’oiseau’s Jersey Cow knit fabric is the perfect addition to that quilt your mama’s been making.

One and Two Company has the right idea with this cute little Cowboy Hat and Cactus Applique pattern!

YEEEHAW!! My son would love this Hat and Vest Pattern Combo from 3 Boys and a Ball of Yarn. Let him be a KEEYOWBOI for Halloween!

You makin’ fun-o-me, Baca Creations with this Detatchable Beard/Beanie pattern!?

Here in the south, the greatest aspirations for our boys is to serve our country. Make this Unisex Freedom Fighter Newsboy Beanie Hat Pattern From Crochet by Jennifer and show us your American pride! Thank you, boys in green! 
KEEYOWBOIS AND INJUNS! The game of perpetual imaginary pursuit in the south lol Gramma Beans Pocahontas Hat Pattern.

Can’t wait until MY cowboy gets home so he can give ME a ride on his Big Green Tractor! Big Green Tractor Basket from A Crocheted Simplicity has many uses! Easter, everyday egg collection… tv remotes… Must have for any deep south family!

Don’t crochet? Auntie Jen’s Horse Lovey (finished item) – Pattern by Bowtykes.

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Baby Bumblebee Free Pattern

I LOVE being an aunt. It is the most fulfilling relationship next to being a mother. I thought for a long time I would never have children, and a part of me always thought I would only ever be an aunt, so those little ones mean ALMOST as much to me as my own children. My little nephew LOVES this song! He has just learned to speak well and in the last six months has really blossomed from that baby babble to something more akin to the human language. lol I thought it was so cute to think of him singing this song and that cuteness inspired me to make him a Baby Bumblebee! This is for my nephew 🙂 Now to be inspired to make something special for each of the other 5! lol
Materials:
G and F hook
Preferred Yarn: Red heart Bright Yellow , black and white
Tapestry needle
Scissors
(2) 12 mm safety eyes (Alternative: may stitch eyes on using thread.)
Polyfil stuffing
FINISHED SIZE: 4’’X4’’ by 3’’ wide
 
Skill level: Easy
 
 
 
Gauge:
Not Important
Abbreviations:
MC – Magic Circle                            For a tutorial on the magic circle, visit my blog at the following link:
                                                http://articlesofadomesticgoddess.blogspot.com/2014/03/magic-circle-tutorial.html
CH – Chain
ST; STS – Stitch or stitches
SC – Single Crochet
SC2TOG – Single Crochet 2 Together (decrease)
SLST – Slip Stitch
SK – Skip
FO – Fasten Off
X after a number = number of stitches to work in after current stitch (ex: sc 2X = sc in next two stitches)
 
Tips:     
Ch 1 at the beginning of the round do not count as first st.
Always place the first stitch in the pattern after the ch 1 in same st as ch1.
Chains at the beginning of the round serve solely for filler purposes, so that a large hole is not left in the piece. They should be ignored and when you join at the end of your rounds, you should be sl stitching into the first actual stitch, not the chain filler.
Body:
With Black and G hook
Round 1:              6 sc in mc, join to top of first sc (6)
Round 2:              Ch 1, (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (6)
                Round 3:              Ch 1, (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (6)
                Round 4:              Ch 1, (2 sc, 1sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (9)
Color change in join to bright yellow
                Round 5:              Ch 1, (2 sc, sc 2X), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (12)
                Round 6:              Ch 1, (2 sc, sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (18)
Color change in join to black
                Round 7:              Ch 1, (2 sc, sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
                Round 8:              Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Color change in join to bright yellow
Round 9:              Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Round 10:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Color change in join to black
Round 11:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Round 12:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Color change in join to bright yellow
Round 13:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Round 14:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Color change in join to black
Stuff
Round 15:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Round 16:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Color change in join to yellow
Round 17:            Ch 1 (sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (27)
Round 18:            Ch 1, (sc2tog, sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (18)
Round 19:            Ch 1, (sc2tog, sc), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (12)
Place 12mm safety eyes between rounds 18 and 19, making sure that seam is along bottom of bumblebee. Eyes should be across 6 stitches, 4 stitches showing in between them.
Round 20:            Ch 1, (sc2tog), Repeat () around, join to top of first sc (6)
Stuff again before closing so that it’s firm but not so firm that stuffing shows through the stitches.
Stitch firmly
FO and leave a long tail for sewing hole shut.
Using black yarn, stitch eyebrows and/or smiling mouth on
Feelers:
With Black and G hook (if you have trouble since these pieces are so small, try a smaller hook size)
Feelers are worked in spiral. Do not join.
Make sure to mark your first stitch in each round to help you keep count.
Round 1:              5 sc in mc  (5)
Round 2:              (sc), Repeat () around (5)
Round 3:              sc2tog, sc 3X (4)
Round 4:              (sc), Repeat () around (4)
FO and leave long tail for sewing. Attach to first set of black stripes behind face.
Wings:
With White and F hook
                Round 1:              5sc in mc, join (5)
                Round 2:              Ch 1, 2 sc in each around, join (10)
                Row 3:                  Ch 2, turn, 2dc in same st, hdc in next, sc in next,
                                                Hdc in next, 2dc in last. (7)
                Sl st in next and sl st loosely around, join to first and FO
Just for fun:
Here is a video to watch and sing with your little about their new baby bumblebee! I hope your little enjoys his/her baby bumblebee as much as I did designing it!

 

Articles of a Domestic Goddess                                                              

www.pinterest.com/ArtofaDG
www.ravelry.com/designers/articles-of-a-domestic-goddess     


© Donna Knox – Articles of a Domestic Goddess
*******************************************************************************************************************************************
This pattern, once paid for, is completely and totally yours. Please do not share or redistribute my patterns and/or photographs in any way, shape or form. I humbly ask that you credit Articles of a Domestic Goddess if you feel so inclined. If you are pleased with this pattern, please head on over to the Articles of a Domestic Goddess Facebook, Ravelry or Etsy shop and review there. I LOVE seeing pictures of pieces created using my patterns if you want to share. Items made from this pattern may be sold. If you are displeased with the pattern in any way, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I want you to be happy with any product with my name on it. I accept constructive criticism happily.
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Matching Gauge and Why it is SO Important!

I used to think that gauge was just a couple of numbers at the top of a pattern. I mean, my gauge MUST be close to the pattern writer’s two inches if I’m using the same size hook, right? Just how differently does Caron Simply Soft vs Red Heart Super Saver vs Red Heart Soft vs Bernat vs Vanna’s Choice work up? They’re all worsted weight after all. Here, we will explore gauge and why it is SO VERY imperative to you and your crochet projects.

The first few months that I crocheted, I never took a second glance at gauge. I skipped it. Just totally didn’t even look at it. I just got lucky that most things fit well. (And some things didn’t.) When I began checking my gauge I realized that I was WAY off on some of them. A lot of my problem then was technique. I wrote a blog on technique, how it affects gauge and how to fix it. I have come to realize that MANY people have a flaw in their technique even if they don’t see it at first glace.
Here is that BLOG

So let’s move on to gauge shall we? 

After I figured out my own flaws on technique, which were many 🙂  I moved on to hook and yarn. There are SO many different brands that manufacture worsted weight yarn. Guess what? They are NOT all equal. You can pretty much use any similar weighted yarn though and come to the same measurements for your project by measuring gauge.

So let’s talk about these mysterious numbers at the top of the pattern. Don’t sweat about it but DEFINITELY give it the respect it deserves and DON’T SKIP IT!

Gauge is usually written something like this:

Gauge:
With H hook:
2″ X 2″ square: 7 dc X 3 rows

What the heck does that mean anyway!? This means that the yarn you select will need to measure a 2 inch by 2 inch square after having crocheted 3 rows of dc, 7 dc across. A written out pattern for this would look something like this:

Row 1:           Ch 8, dc in third ch from the hook and across to beginning (7)
Row 2:           Ch 2, turn, dc in next st and across (7)
Row 3:           Repeat Row 2

 


Once you have finished your swatch, take a ruler or measuring tape and see how it came out. It should measure 2 inches from top to bottom, and 2 inches from side to side.

 

What if it doesn’t?

If it’s a little bit smaller than 2” X 2”, then your yarn is a little thinner than the yarn used by the pattern writer and you will need to go up a hook size and try again.

If it’s a little bit bigger than 2” X 2”, then your yarn is a little thicker than the yarn used by the pattern writer and you will need to go down a hook size and try again.

Rinse and repeat. You may have to go up or down TWO hook sizes to obtain gauge. And there is NO SHAME in doing this! I am queen of using Red Heart Soft and just using my regular old Red Heart Super Saver white with it. I go down a hook size when I start the Super Saver because it’s a little thicker than the other. No one can tell the difference.

The only thing that WILL change:

You need to look at your gauge swatch when you’re finished obtaining gauge. If you are using thinner yarn, you probably had to go up a hook size. If that’s the case, then thinner yarn + a bigger hook sometimes means that the piece will be airier than the original in the pattern. For bags, purses, or sweaters this might not be ideal. You may want to find a more comparable yarn.

Likewise, if you’re using a thicker yarn, you probably had to go down a hook size. If that’s the case then thicker yarn + a smaller hook sometimes means that the piece will be tightly crocheted with no airiness to it at all. Lacy patterns such as some lacy scarves, baby dresses, etc done in a 3 weight or Red Heart Soft or Caron Simply Soft probably won’t look the same if using Red Heart Super Saver and you may want to find a more comparable yarn.

Caron Simply Soft: is weird. lol There is no other way to say it. It says it is a worsted weight yarn, but it works up the same as a 3 weight yarn. In my personal opinion, it is NOT interchangeable with most other worsted weight yarns. (It also snags like crazy!) For things like lacy scarves though and baby dresses done in a 3 though, this would do lovely 🙂 Just match gauge! 🙂


What if I want to use a thinner/thicker yarn on purpose?

There are quite a few reasons you might want to do this. It might be that this particular yarn that you want to use is just what you have on hand. It might be that you WANT to change the look of an item to be more airy. I say go for it! There is no way to know unless you try it. As a matter of fact, a project looks completely different if done in thicker/thinner yarn sometimes. Just match gauge. I have actually done this more recently for my amigurumi that I want to come out a tad smaller. Instead of Red Heart Super Saver, I use Red Heart Soft. Or if I want it a lot smaller, I have been using Caron Simply Soft. For ami’s gauge doesn’t matter as much because it’s not a fitted item. Just note that your safety eye to full body ratio may change slightly. You want the eyes to look normal, not out of place, you may also need to go down a size on eyes.

More Misc Notes on Gauge

Gauge can be written in the round or in rows and is usually 1, 2, or 4 inches square or round depending on the pattern you’re completing.

DO NOT:  
Do not crochet tighter or more loosely to match gauge unless you plan to crochet that way for the entire piece. The yarn should slide effortlessly on the hook neck but tension should be moderately tight. Just crochet how you feel comfortable crocheting, because trust me, you’re going to revert back to what feels normal to you, especially if you put down and pick up your project. Save yourself the headache and go up or down a hook size.

Gauge is not the same after finishing one row of the swatch as it is after finishing all three rows required. Do not crochet one row, measure across, get a height measurement and do math and guess that it will be the right size when it comes out. As a matter of fact, if you’re getting 2 inches across after the first row, once you get to the third row, your gauge across will be too small. Gauge swatches are not that big and don’t take that long and they are worth checking.

What if your gauge swatch matches 2 inches across, but not 2 inches up and down, or visa versa?

You may not EVEN realize that you do it. But the method that you hold, use and maneuver the yarn may be altering your gauge swatch. You would benefit greatly from my other blog post about technique. I myself had a technique problem that I recently corrected and it changed the way I crocheted forever! Take a moment and explore technique with me, even if you don’t think you are doing it wrong:

Amigurimi Technique that will always work and will change the way you crochet FOREVER!

 


I would be happy to help anyone in need of it. If you have a problem with gauge or technique, I can try to help you pinpoint the areas that need work. I wish I had someone to ask questions to when I first started. And while I’m by no means advanced and I may not know the answer to your question, I’ll find someone who does. 🙂 Happy hooking you marvelous ladies!

 

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Pattern Release! Stunning Shells Ear Warmer

PATTERN RELEASE!! Stunning Shells Ear Warmer

Crochet is NOT just for winter and don’t let the name fool you. This works well in the winter to keep ears warm, but is breezy enough for the summer. (And I live in Texas) Offered in sizes Newborn to Adult.


Buy the Stunning Shells Ear Warmer Pattern on Ravelry




Buy the Stunning Shells Ear Warmer Pattern on Craftsy

Don’t crochet? Buy the Stunning Shells Ear Warmer (finished item) on Etsy

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Frankenstein Monster Halloween Candy Hauler Tote Pattern Release

PATTERN RELEASE!! Frankenstein Monster Halloween Candy Hauler Tote

Let your kid be the envy of the neighborhood! NOT JUST FOR BOYS! Check out the one done in pink on the ravelry sale page! 🙂 I made this guy in a pinch Halloween morning, so I know he works up quickly. 10.5” X 11″ X 5”

Buy the Frankenstein Monster Halloween Candy Hauler Pattern on Ravelry

Buy the Frankenstein Monster Halloween Candy Hauler Pattern on Craftsy

Don’t crochet? Buy the Frankenstein Monster Halloween Candy Hauler (finished item) on Etsy

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