US terms VS UK terms

I have a lot of followers that are overseas. I always feel bad when releasing a pattern in US terms because I know many of you have to work out in your heads the conversion and I keep thinking: “How tiring that must be!”.


 

Here is a chart that should help you to distinguish the differences:

uk vs us


 

US terms Single Crochet/UK terms Double Crochet
Insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through both loops on hook.

US terms Half Double Crochet/UK terms Half Treble
Yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through all three loops on hook.

US terms Double Crochet/UK terms Treble
Yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through the first two loops on hook, yo, pull through two loops again.

US terms Triple/Treble Crochet/UK terms Double Treble
Yo twice, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through the first two loops on hook, yo, pull through two loops again, yo, pull through two loops a third time.

US terms Double Treble Crochet/UK terms Triple/Treble Treble
Yo three times, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through the first two loops on hook, yo, pull through two loops again, yo, pull through two loops a third time, yo pull through last two loops.

US terms Slip Stitch/UK terms Single Crochet
Insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, pull the first loop you pulled up (the one closer to the hook end) through the last loop on your hook (the loop closer to the grip)


 

In the future I might convert my patterns to UK terminology. I know what a pain it would be for me to see a pattern using UK terminology ONLY.

If you are interested in seeing some of my patterns using UK terminology, let me know in the comments below!

If there are enough of you interested then I will consider making the changes and offering both terminologies!

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5 thoughts on “US terms VS UK terms”

  1. This is really handy for US/UK pattern users alike. There are times when I’ve come across a pattern and it happened to be in UK terms, and I’ve had to look up the differences. A chart is very useful!

     

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